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Research: Consultations and Surveys

 

Researchers at the University of Cambridge are exploring autistic people and their family or carers’ access and experiences of a range of services across Europe. This project is called ACCESS-EU which is the policy part of a larger research project called AIMS-2-TRIALS .

 

They want to hear from you if:

you are autistic and over 16 years old or a family carer of an autistic person over 16 who is unable to complete the survey themselves

AND

you have (or your autistic family member has) accessed (successfully and/or unsuccessfully) a service

 

The survey is open to individuals (or carers with a family member) with a formal diagnosis of autism, those who are self diagnosed and/or waiting for an autism diagnostic service.

 

The survey asks questions about experiences with services received in the past two years. It takes 10-20 minutes to complete. There is more information about the study and the aims of the research at the start of the survey.

 

For more information and to access the survey click here

 

The survey is open until end of August 2020. If you have any questions, please contact the study team on [email protected]

The NAS has set up a survey titled "Poll: Autism Friendly Changes"  Your feedback is important! Here is the survey

The NAS campaign, Not Enough, is demanding better support and services for autistic people.

 

You'll find that a shocking two in three autistic people in England don't get the support they need, which could equate to up to 327,000 autistic adults in England. Current support is simply not enough.

 

For information on the campaign go to:

https://www.autism.org.uk/what-we-do/campaign/not-enough

 

City, University of London Research 

 

Covid as a routine disruption for autistic young people with complex needs: what can we learn?

 

Researchers at City, University of London are studying the factors that make it easier or more difficult for autistic young people with complex needs to deal with the disruption of strict routines caused by the COVID-19 lockdown in the UK.

 

If you have any questions about this project, or would like to register your interest, you can email the researcher to find out more.

 

What is involved?

A series of online questionnaires over 2-3 weeks, plus a final informal interview at the end.

 

Who can take part?

Parents/carers of autistic children and young people aged 8-18 years old who attend a UK-based Special Educational Needs school.

 

Contact City, University of London (or Autistica) for more details.  The research is being led by Anna Lambrechts.

 

The University of Plymouth and the National Institute of Health Research

 

The impact of lockdown on wellbeing, healthcare and access to communities for autistic adults

 

Researchers at The University of Plymouth and the National Institute of Health Research (Peninsula Applied Research Collaboration) are studying the impact of COVID-19 on wellbeing, healthcare and access to communities for autistic people. The results of the research will help to identify opportunities for services to learn and improve to support autistic people more effectively in future.

 

If you have any questions about this project, or would like to register your interest, you can email the researcher to find out more.

 

What is involved?

This study involves taking an online survey which will take approximately 30-60 minutes to complete.

 

Who can take part?

To take part in this study, you must be over 18, living in the UK, and have a diagnosis of an autism spectrum condition or believe yourself to be autistic.

 

For more details go to the page on the University of Plymouth website

 

 

 

Take part in the Autism Core Capabilities rEPosiTory (ACCEPT) study

 

Maudsley Learning, King’s College London (KCL), and the South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) are working with Health Education England on a national project.  This project entails identifying and sharing a range of approaches to support health, social care and public facing workforces across England to use the Core Capabilities Framework for

Supporting Autistic People (2019). By doing so, we and HEE hope to improve the provision of high quality training that can improve the lives of autistic people, their carers and families, and staff.

 

The success of this project relies on hearing from people with autism, their families and carers, health and social care workers, trainers and anyone who might work with people with autism. If you fall into one of these groups then please read about how to participate!

 

Click here to read more details

 

More detailed information about the Autism Core Capabilities Framework can be found here:

https://www.skillsforhealth.org.uk/services/item/945-capabilities-frameworks